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Just had a thought Sean, did they not have two tines up the back of the carrier which used to slide beneath the stack of bales when you went to pick them up, i know the ones for Hesston bales do and i get a feeling the ones like your model is based on may have done as well  ;)

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Just had a thought Sean, did they not have two tines up the back of the carrier which used to slide beneath the stack of bales when you went to pick them up, i know the ones for Hesston bales do and i get a feeling the ones like your model is based on may have done as well  ;)

yeah i think i know what you mean Gav, i've seen them around here, keeps them from falling out the back :)

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Just had a thought Sean, did they not have two tines up the back of the carrier which used to slide beneath the stack of bales when you went to pick them up, i know the ones for Hesston bales do and i get a feeling the ones like your model is based on may have done as well  ;)

??? not sure on that gav, like i say a long time now (8/9 years) since i last used one in anger

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??? not sure on that gav, like i say a long time now (8/9 years) since i last used one in anger

used to just be a cage that slid under the bales from what i remember, it then became the back....if that makes sense :-\ :-\

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Exactly the same as one I was watching the other day near Trowbridge Sean. That had no slides or spikes or owt either. Even if it doesn't lift the bales it will still look the bizzle parked in a farmyard.

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We still use two of these for hay and straw, is ideal as the farms/ stables we bale for have their own loader and helpers in the yard so we can bale and cart 3000+ bales in a day without touching them. (except for the odd badly built stack which gets knocked over ;D)

Our two 56 grabs have one T shaped spike on the bottom which goes in the middle of the bottom bales, you do have to be careful to back into the stacks squarly otherwise the spike will push a bottom bale out and then either demolish stack or you will pick it up ok and the first you know about it is when the stack falls over in the yard when is put down?

Then on the way back to the feild you can pick up the bales thet you dropped on the road  ;D ;D!

Will try to get some pics when we next use them.

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for there time they were great for quick bale moving, we would stack and haul everything with them, with the 290 in the field stacking and the 690 and loader at the barn getting them up as high as it could reach, then we hand stacked the last of it, saved hours of stacking on trailers then unloading the other end

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The one iused many moons ago was a cooke one. It didn't have anthing - spike etc - on the bottom or underneath the stack .  What it did have is extra bars on the bottom/back of the sides the pinch the bales in more than the rest of the sides, so (if have totally confused you) the bottom layer of the stack was held tighter than the rest.

I remember them riding well when loaded but like a bone shaker when empty.  These were a real boon when they came out because prior to that we had to hand ball the bales onto an artic then hand ball them into the shed.  Once these came out they came from the field in 56's or 48's for hay, then were lifted into the shed by a duplicate attatchment for the fork-lift - a lot easier.  However we were expected to do more!!!!!

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The one iused many moons ago was a cooke one. It didn't have anthing - spike etc - on the bottom or underneath the stack .  What it did have is extra bars on the bottom/back of the sides the pinch the bales in more than the rest of the sides, so (if have totally confused you) the bottom layer of the stack was held tighter than the rest.

I remember them riding well when loaded but like a bone shaker when empty.  These were a real boon when they came out because prior to that we had to hand ball the bales onto an artic then hand ball them into the shed.  Once these came out they came from the field in 56's or 48's for hay, then were lifted into the shed by a duplicate attatchment for the fork-lift - a lot easier.  However we were expected to do more!!!!!

recon you have confirmed what make it is mate, this one was great loaded, but made a hell of a noise when empty, even on a smooth road, rattled round something terrible, makes sense to as the bale sledge was same colour,

the one we had was a 64 bale job, 8 high stacks,

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