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1/87 scale Jd's on my layout


bROADOAK
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Colonel?s Crossing my HO scale American layout, and it is county fair day. Some of the agricultural pageant entrants have arrived by rail on this pulpwood flat.

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This is the machine that brought the tractors to town, isn?t she gorgeous? It is a standard gauge three truck Shay.

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As much as I love the machinery be it the tractors and those wondeful loco's. .. .. as always it is the buildings and scenery which strike me down. That old elevator tower is just like on where we set up camp to harvest in North Dakota, just like it!!

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Thanks Tris you are always too kind. The buildings are mostly scratch built using a Plasticard shell and scale plastic sheeting for corrugated iron or plain white card as a covering. It is then painted using matt Humbrol and weathered with acrylics to tone it down and make it look older.

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The picture is of a Matchbox Fordson Major that is almost as old as me but probably in better condition. It is parked outside the Continental Grain Companies Elevator at Benson, the other end of the layout from Colonel?s Crossing. The freight car is a covered hopper being loaded with wheat which will be shipped abroad via the one of the Gulf ports. The back ground behind the tractor I painted onto cartridge paper and stuck it to the back scene.

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The problem I had on my model railroad was finding the space for a farm as I wanted to feature a few tractor models. There just wasn?t room for a farm yard as such so I came up with the idea of an agricultural contractor. So that is how KAP Lumber came into existence. They have a small yard next to the grade crossing at Colonel?s Crossing.  The layout is set in south west Arkansas in the 1970?s and Lumber and farming are two key industries providing traffic for my trains.

There are a pair of Southern Pacific locos rolling past the yard  in the background.

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  • 2 weeks later...

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Not really a tractor but a pulpwood loader seen here on my HO scale model railway.

The model is by Wiking who make an extensive range in HO 1/87 scale. See www.modelmasters.co.uk  These might be the answer if you are short of space and don?t have room to work in 1/32 scale. They look good with Manor farm from Metcalfe buildings. See www.metcalfemodels.com

Peter

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I?m afraid the layout is firmly fixed in a spare bedroom at home so cannot be exhibited. The layout is a U shaped point  to point set in south west Arkansas USA in the 1970?s. One end is called Colonel?s Crossing and the other end Benson. Both places are entirely fictitious. The best I can do is offer a virtual tour but it really has very little to do with model farms other than it represents an agricultural area. The scenery and techniques used to make them may be of interest as they can be applied to your own model farms. If you want me to do a tour I will happily do so. Perhaps we should ask the forum moderator for their advice.

Peter

:)

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Just stunning, your work really is what modelling is all about. I love it. Let's have that virtual tour! It's so nice to see farm modelling blended with the other things, gives so much more realism. Working in 32nd it is very difficult to find the space to actually get out of the yard, but your communities are superb, whole worlds in miniature!

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Just stunning, your work really is what modelling is all about. I love it. Let's have that virtual tour! It's so nice to see farm modelling blended with the other things, gives so much more realism. Working in 32nd it is very difficult to find the space to actually get out of the yard, but your communities are superb, whole worlds in miniature!

I agree - I have learnt a lot from railway layout creators and I would love a virtual tour so I can get some new ideas

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ColonelsCrossing.jpg

We will start the tour at the Colonel?s Crossing end of the layout. The whole purpose of any railway is to carry goods or passengers, at CC it is a freight only operation. The main commodities carried are Bauxite ore, lumber and agricultural products from local farmers. This section is 10 feet long and 18 inches wide.

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The next section is 8feet long and 22 inches wide and forms the east yard at Benson. It also joins colonel?s Crossing to Benson. There are two industries one is cement and the other is pulp wood, used in the paper making industry.

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The Benson section is 8 feet long and 2 feet wide. It also relies on local farms for some of its traffic, mainly grain into the large elevator. There is also a flour mill and Arkansas Feeds who produce mainly chicken feed.

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Two Southern Pacific F7 diesel units wait while a small end cab switcher works the empty cars through the bauxite ore loader at Colonel?s Crossing.

The Kenwood truck in the foreground has brought in a load of pulpwood which will be loaded onto special flat cars for shipment out.

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This picture shows a Southern Pacific GP60 arriving At CC with empty pulp wood cars and rumbling over the grade crossing (level crossing). In the background can be seen the wooden depot and the water tower. The red tractor waiting at the crossing is an International and the one at the front by the road a John Deere. Colonel?s creek can also be seen, this was made by covering coloured plaster with many coats of clear varnish to build up thickness. If you just pour on varnish and leave to dry in one thick coat it will wrinkle.

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RoadtankerloadingfeedatCCfarmcoop.jpg

Another view of Colonel?s Crossing showing a bulk feed tanker being loaded at the Farmer?s Co-op (a modified kit). The Purina Chows elevator (scratch built) can be seen at the rear behind the Burlington & Northern switcher. The small green panel truck belongs to a local farmer who has called in to collect some bags of feed for his stock.

The flush roadway is made of several layers of card tinted with matt grey emulsion paint. The backscene is hand painted with acrylics.

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A general view looking down at Colonel?s Crossing showing Colonel?s creek in the foreground. Rockville building supply can be seen at the left next to the Purina Chow?s Grain store elevator. The Farmers Co-op Elevator is to the right and the grounded caboose belongs to the yardmaster who controls all freight movements in the yard.

The track layout allows locomotives to run round their trains, that is to get to the other end of the train for return journeys.

Peter

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